John O’Brien and Timothy Chesters – Trauma and the Early Modern (1)

Podcastson November 24th, 2010No Comments

king_asaDate: Wednesday 24 November, 5.00 pm
Venue: Royal Holloway, IN032

Speakers:

Professor John O’Brien, RHUL, ‘Beginnings and Trauma’

Dr Timothy Chesters, RHUL, ‘Divine Trauma’

On the face of things, there seems something ineradicably modern about trauma as a concept. Born, as ‘traumatic neurosis’, alongside modern psychoanalysis at the end of the nineteenth century, and revitalised within deconstruction at the close of the twentieth, trauma theory has also been shaped by a series of – it is sometimes supposed – uniquely modern catastrophes: World War I, the Holocaust, Hiroshima, Vietnam. So what if anything can trauma theory reveal of other historical periods? Is to speak of trauma in the early modern period, for example, merely to indulge in futile anachronism? Or can trauma theory still teach us something about early modern violence and the mental scars it left behind? More provocatively, perhaps, can early modern texts tell us anything of trauma theory itself: its assumptions, its blind spots, its own unspoken past? In the first of a two-part mini-series on ‘Trauma and the Early Modern’, Timothy Chesters and John O’Brien test the applicability of trauma theory in a number of texts arising out of the French Wars of Religion (1562-1598).

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Introduction by Colin Davis

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John O’BrienBeginnings and Trauma

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handout: Beginnings and Trauma (download)

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Timothy ChestersDivine Trauma

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handout: Divine Trauma (download)

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questions:

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